Acree/Sachse/Hoover/Ogden/Skipworth/Nelson/TenEyck/Williamson
& Associated Families

DUTCH RESIDENCE NORTH OF NEW YORK CITY
IN THE 17TH AND 18TH CENTURIES

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Until the English seized New Netherland in 1664, Dutch rule extended north from New York City to Albany. A Dutch fort was erected in that area by fur traders in 1614, five years after its discovery by Henry Hudson, an English explorer financed by the Dutch who had sailed up the river now bearing his name to establish Dutch claims.

When the Dutch West India Company began to colonize New Netherland in 1624, it strategically dispersed settlers from the port of New Amsterdam on lower Manhattan Island in an effort to fortify its territorial ambitions - sending them north on the Hudson River, south on the Delaware River into New Jersey, and east onto Long Island.

In Albany County, to the north, the capital city was known as Fort Orange. The historic neighboring communities of Beverwyck and Rensselaerwyck have since been absorbed by the city of Albany. In Rensselaer County, across the river from Albany, there was, and still is, the town of Troy. In Ulster County, downriver, in the vicinity of Kingston, there was an early cluster of historic communities including Esopus, Wiltwyck, Warwarsing, Rochester (present-day Accord), and Hurley (which kept its name).

In Westchester County, further downriver, there is a town once known as North Castle that is now called Rye. While our Dutch ancestors who became associated with the Ogden, TenEyck and Williamson branches of our family tree settled in the above areas, families bringing the Ogden surname itself to America moved into North Castle from nearby Stamford, Connecticut, as English settlers approached New Netherland from their New England bastions.

Many of our ancestors resided in these four New York counties, as shown on the enlarged map below, with approximate years of residence - dating from a couple's arrival at a location or marriage there. Some moves are detailed, but complexity has been minimized by focusing on primary residences - usually where most of their children were born.

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